Arab uprisings break the Orientalist stereotype

CAIRO, Feb 16 (Reuters) – Arab uprisings against unpopular Western-backed rulers have undercut the arguments of some Western intellectuals about passive populations who are not prepared to fight for democracy.

During the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, neoconservative cheerleaders for war who had direct access to Western policymakers said force was the only way to take down Arab dictators. A minority of Arab intellectuals agreed with them. Continue reading Arab uprisings break the Orientalist stereotype

Analysis: Arab uprisings overturn cliches on democracy

By Andrew Hammond

CAIRO | Wed Feb 16, 2011 8:42am EST

(Reuters) – Arab uprisings against unpopular Western-backed rulers have undercut the arguments of some Western intellectuals about passive populations who are not prepared to fight for democracy.

During the 2003 U.S. invasion of Iraq, neoconservative cheerleaders for war who had direct access to Western policymakers said force was the only way to take down Arab dictators. A minority of Arab intellectuals agreed with them. Continue reading Analysis: Arab uprisings overturn cliches on democracy

Egyptians regain sense of pride in damaged nation

CAIRO: For a country with 5,000 years of history, Egypt’s fall into a deep social, economic and political malaise during the three decades of Hosni Mubarak’s rule had a particularly bitter sting to it.

Egyptians like to call their country “umm Al-dunya,” or mother of the world, and for much of their history they had reasonable claim to the title.

http://www.thedailynewsegypt.com/people/egyptians-regain-sense-of-pride-in-damaged-nation-dp2.html

Egypt state media run to catch up with revolution

By Dina Zayed and Andrew Hammond

Fri Feb 11, 2011 9:55am EST

CAIRO (Reuters) – In the morning it was hosting guests denouncing protesters against President Hosni Mubarak as Iranian agents. By evening, it was airing a protester openly calling for the fall of the ruling system.

That shift by Egyptian state television in the course of a single day earlier this week was emblematic of a broader transformation over the course of the popular uprising. Continue reading Egypt state media run to catch up with revolution

Egyptians regain sense of pride in damaged nation

By Marwa Awad and Andrew Hammond

CAIRO | Fri Feb 11, 2011 5:57pm EST

(Reuters) – For a country with 5,000 years of history, Egypt’s fall into a deep social, economic and political malaise during the three decades of Hosni Mubarak’s rule had a particularly bitter sting to it.

Egyptians like to call their country “umm al-dunya,” or mother of the world, and for much of their history they had reasonable claim to the title. Continue reading Egyptians regain sense of pride in damaged nation

Activist’s tears may be game changer in Egypt

By Marwa Awad and Andrew Hammond

CAIRO, Feb 8 (Reuters) – One man’s tears provided a new impetus on Tuesday to protesters in Egypt seeking to keep up momentum in their campaign, now in its third week, to topple President Hosni Mubarak.

Wael Ghonim, a Google executive detained and blindfolded by state security for 12 days, broke down in a television interview on Monday after his release saying a system that arrested people for speaking out must be torn down. Continue reading Activist’s tears may be game changer in Egypt

Witness: Mubarak speech changes game in Egypt protests

By Andrew Hammond

CAIRO | Wed Feb 2, 2011 1:34pm EST

(Reuters) – Walking across Tahrir Square in central Cairo Wednesday, it was hard to miss a huge slogan daubed in paint on the road for the military helicopters above to see: Game Over.

After Mubarak’s dramatic speech late Tuesday, announcing he would not seek re-election in September but vowing to stay on for now to see through democratic reforms, the question was whose game was over. Continue reading Witness: Mubarak speech changes game in Egypt protests